The Protean Poetics of Spiders and Seeds | ASLE 2015

Can’t wait for ASLE 2015!! This presentation is based on a contribution on poetics forthcoming in The Edinburgh Companion to Animal Studies.         All this work by Aaron Moe is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License. Based on a work at http://aaronmoe.com.  

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Zoopoetics Chapter Descriptions

Zoopoetics: Animals and the Making of Poetry (Lanham: Lexington Books, 2014). The Coat of a Horse: A Prelude      This prelude establishes the agency of a horse’s bodily poiesis in a way that anticipates the argument of the introduction. The horse becomes a maker through the somatic gestures of his ears,…

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Publication of “Toward a Zoopolis”

“Toward a Zoopolis: Animal Poiesis and the Poetry of Emily Dickinson and Brenda Hillman” is now published in the section on Animality and Ecocriticism, guest edited by Scott Slovic, in the online journal Forum for World Literature Studies (Volume 6, Issue 1, 2014).  In the introduction to the section, Slovic…

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Endorsements for Zoopoetics

The endorsements are finalized for Zoopoetics: Animals and the Making of Poetry, as is the cover. “Zoopoetics is an original, lucid examination of how animals shape the human art of poetry. Drawing upon the foundational work of such scholars as Paul Shepard, Donna Haraway, and David Abram, Aaron M. Moe…

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Flyer for Zoopoetics Presentation @ Bundy Reading Room | January 18, 2013

In this presentation, I discuss some of the crucial underpinnings of zoopoetics, and then I highlight the zoopoetic dynamic in Cummings’ and Whitman’s work. At the end, I read from my forthcoming essay “Toward Zoopoetics: Rethinking Whitman’s ‘original energy’.”   Many thanks to Rebecca for making this flyer! For a…

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Zoopoetics: Another Vision and Revision

In previous publications, blogs, and discussions with students, I have set forth a “two-fold” foci of zoopoetics. Both foci spin out of the etymology that suggests the makings of animals: 1) animals are makers in their own right, creating their own bodily poiesis; 2) some of the most innovative breakthroughs…

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